A new study has provided a sobering, if not shameful, statistic that ought to be a wake-up call for lawmakers and public health policymakers all around the country: one in 25 teenagers in the United States attempts to commit suicide, a fact that is increasingly being blamed on psychotropic drugs which are being prescribed by the truckloads.

The study, published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association’s Psychiatry, doesn’t give a precise reason for why so many of our teenagers are trying to take their own lives but, according to Heidi Stevenson at Gaia Health, the study “does give a telling clue – and that clue leads directly to the doorstep of modern psychiatry.”

For one thing, she notes, the study reads like a “marketing tool for the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-IV,” which is the psychiatric field’s diagnostic bible:

The vast majority of adolescents with these behaviors meet lifetime criteria for at least one DSM-IV mental disorder assessed in the survey. … The most consistently significant associations of these disorders are with suicide ideation, although a number of disorders are also predictors of plans and both planned and unplanned attempts among ideators.

Are psych drugs to blame for high rates of teen suicide?, 2/24/13

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